BBC wifi detector vans

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Flexx-uk
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Re: BBC wifi detector vans

Post by Flexx-uk » Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:17 am

It would be more something like this than a camera per say.

http://www.aaronia.com/products/spectru ... n-rf-view/

Flexx-uk
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Re: BBC wifi detector vans

Post by Flexx-uk » Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:34 am

Albert H wrote:
Sun Aug 07, 2016 6:51 pm
Those clowns are really funny! From my desk, I can detect (and identify) over 50 2.4GHz wi-fi networks around here. I can also see around 25 5GHz ones. How are they going to identify which SSID corresponds with the router at Number 17? How are they going to identify "their" packets? How are they going to identify TV content being distributed around my house on Cat 6 cable?

The answer is simple. over 85% of people NEVER change the default wifi password. In the shady world we now sadly live in you don't think BT, Virgin, Plusnet, Ect don't keep a list of ever single key pair for there devices?

Since the snoopers charter came into effect it would be highly possible that this data "Could" be granted per say if there is some "legal" ramifications.

Out of all the networks you noticed I guess most of them were kept as there standard default IE BTHomehub4 / VM234293 / ect ect..

4 theoretical things that can be used to gain further information from the airwaves is mac address. lets say BBC were trying to prosecute someone for watching on-line services without the license. It could be possible for them to.

1. Log the IP at the point of entry to BBC services. log all machine details ( Mac address, Computer name, IP address, DNS,)
2. Reverse lookup the IP address or contact the broadband provider for customer details
3. from this information is could be possible to just monitor the airwaves with such tools as air-crack air-mon to pickup the client MAC address on the network without breaching the security of the network.
4. Snoop the MAC address of the router as this never changes (unless you use DDW-RT or similar is also point of reference over the airwaves. If someone changes BTHomehub to Myinternetwifi the MAC address of the router is broadcast in burst packets could also be used to identify a specific network.

Packets can be decrypted very easy over wifi just have a play about with wireshark and a wifi pineapple and you will see how easy ssl stripping ect can be.

Use DNSCrypt - Use OpenVPN - Use SSH - Use Proxys - :) Stay alive! :tup

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thewisepranker
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Re: BBC wifi detector vans

Post by thewisepranker » Sat Dec 16, 2017 9:10 pm

Flexx-uk wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:17 am
It would be more something like this than a camera per say.

http://www.aaronia.com/products/spectru ... n-rf-view/
That is useless from inside one van.

Anyway, say it did work, what are you expecting to see?

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Maximus
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Re: BBC wifi detector vans

Post by Maximus » Sun Dec 17, 2017 12:34 pm

thewisepranker wrote:Why would you connect the camera to a spectrum analyser?
It helps the analyser to see further.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Albert H
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Re: BBC wifi detector vans

Post by Albert H » Mon Dec 18, 2017 12:20 pm

Flexx-uk wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:34 am

The answer is simple. over 85% of people NEVER change the default wifi password. In the shady world we now sadly live in you don't think BT, Virgin, Plusnet, Etc don't keep a list of ever single key pair for there devices?

Since the snoopers charter came into effect it would be highly possible that this data "Could" be granted per say if there is some "legal" ramifications.

Out of all the networks you noticed I guess most of them were kept as there standard default IE BTHomehub4 / VM234293 / etc etc.

4 theoretical things that can be used to gain further information from the airwaves is mac address. lets say BBC were trying to prosecute someone for watching on-line services without the license. It could be possible for them to.

1. Log the IP at the point of entry to BBC services. log all machine details ( Mac address, Computer name, IP address, DNS,)
2. Reverse lookup the IP address or contact the broadband provider for customer details
3. from this information is could be possible to just monitor the airwaves with such tools as air-crack air-mon to pickup the client MAC address on the network without breaching the security of the network.
4. Snoop the MAC address of the router as this never changes (unless you use DDW-RT or similar is also point of reference over the airwaves. If someone changes BTHomehub to Myinternetwifi the MAC address of the router is broadcast in burst packets could also be used to identify a specific network.

Packets can be decrypted very easy over wifi just have a play about with wireshark and a wifi pineapple and you will see how easy SSL stripping etc can be.

Use DNSCrypt - Use OpenVPN - Use SSH - Use Proxys - :) Stay alive! :tup
It's all theoretical. I've cracked networks - there are lots of tools around to do it, and if you know a bit about how wi-fi works, and are reasonably conversant with operating command line Linux tools (I am), then you can monitor the traffic over a network..... eventually. It takes a lot of time and data to brute force a network key. There are a couple of workarounds (that I won't go into here, but I will admit that they're deliberate vulnerabilities in Windows and in some Chinese router firmware), but if you've taken the rudimentary steps of changing your wi-fi network name and password (and used a reasonably strong one), you're pretty secure. Identifying MAC addresses gets you only so far. Granted that if the MAC is for a Kodi box (or similar) it's probably streaming music, TV or films, but it's really not of much use.

Actually getting the appropriate warrant, getting the equipment and the people with the technical ability to operate it (Plod are notoriously inefficient when it comes to anything vaguely technical) is simply not going to happen. Perhaps if some numpty brags on Facebook about the thousands of films he's downloaded and it can be shown that he's distributing that material, then they might try a "show trial" in an effort to discourage others. However, this is very unlikely, as the judiciary are also notoriously technophobic, and prosecuting a case like that wouldn't be easy. Both Police and the Lawyers would rather pursue people for potentially "offensive" Tweets and Facebook postings. Remember - if you make any remark that could be considered to be Islamaphobic, your feet won't touch the ground.

Meanwhile, rapists, child molesters, fraudsters and electoral manipulators roam free because of their colours or religions.....
"Why is my rig humming?"
"Because it doesn't know the words!"
;)

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