Simple directional antenna

Everything technical about radio can be discussed here, whether it's transmitting or receiving. Guides, charts, diagrams, etc. are all welcome.
Post Reply
User avatar
silent freq
ne guy
ne guy
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 06, 2019 6:24 pm

Simple directional antenna

Post by silent freq » Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:17 pm

I am researching the possibility of positioning the transmitter in the outskirts of my intended broadcast area. In that case a classic dipole antenna with a circular radiation pattern would spend more than 50% of its power broadcasting outside my intended reception area. I'm not good at making antennas, and a dipole is the simplest I've found.
I've found some paper that claims that if I mount the ground half of my dipole at a horizontal angle and the top half at a vertical angle, then the signal would be directional in the direction the ground half is pointing. Has anybody tried this? -Or do you have any other input on getting cheap and easy directionality?
Here is a link to the paper I found: http://folk.uio.no/tomvs/la4ln/dipole_en.pdf
Skjermbilde.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

nrgkits.nz
no manz can test innit
no manz can test innit
Posts: 194
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2014 10:35 am

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by nrgkits.nz » Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:33 am

What you need is stacked yagi’s for shaped coverage, a couple of 4 element yagis (including the reflector and driven element) will do the job

nrgkits.nz
no manz can test innit
no manz can test innit
Posts: 194
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2014 10:35 am

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by nrgkits.nz » Sat Jun 08, 2019 1:58 am

CFC31697-2195-4472-8607-A4E0200167B8.jpeg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Albert H
proppa neck!
proppa neck!
Posts: 1242
Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2016 1:23 am

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by Albert H » Sat Jun 08, 2019 2:38 am

If you want hemispherical coverage, the simple "H" aerial works well and works better if you stack a couple of them. This will also give you gain in the direction you want to go in. That's extra radiated power at little added expense!

There are plenty of on-line resources for calculating the sizes of the elements, their spacing, and how far apart each aerial should be if you're stacking them. You'll also have to get into matching stubs and phasing harnesses.

It might sound complicated, but if you have a good SWR Bridge (or - even better - an antenna analyser) and you can test at low power, you'll have little trouble in constructing and aligning something that'll give you great results.
"Why is my rig humming?"
"Because it doesn't know the words!"
;)

User avatar
radionortheast
tower block dreamin
tower block dreamin
Posts: 319
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2015 1:38 pm

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by radionortheast » Sat Jun 15, 2019 9:34 am

silent freq wrote:
Fri Jun 07, 2019 11:17 pm
I am researching the possibility of positioning the transmitter in the outskirts of my intended broadcast area. In that case a classic dipole antenna with a circular radiation pattern would spend more than 50% of its power broadcasting outside my intended reception area. I'm not good at making antennas, and a dipole is the simplest I've found.
I've found some paper that claims that if I mount the ground half of my dipole at a horizontal angle and the top half at a vertical angle, then the signal would be directional in the direction the ground half is pointing. Has anybody tried this? -Or do you have any other input on getting cheap and easy directionality?
Here is a link to the paper I found: http://folk.uio.no/tomvs/la4ln/dipole_en.pdf
Skjermbilde.JPG
I had sucess with a horizontal radial in the past, you have to coil the coax to stop it acting as an aerial. I have 1 turn of the coax and have also have a break so it isolated below the radial to stop interactions with the mast, its a very good aerial, I have the radial pointing at 45 degree angle, works very well in a receiver specially with it horizontal. For it been directional it is omidirectional, I found out where to coil the coax with low power using a scanner nearby and also find the best angle of the radial..

User avatar
silent freq
ne guy
ne guy
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 06, 2019 6:24 pm

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by silent freq » Sun Jun 16, 2019 7:36 pm

First of all, thank you all for taking your time to answer my question. Even though I come with more questions it does not diminish the fact that I am very grateful.

@nrgkits.nz: I'm a fat construction worker, and plan to climb as high up in a nearby tree as I can get and fasten the aerial with cable ties. So the 4 element yagi seems out of the question. Are there any solutions that are more portable?
@Albert H: I can't seem to google my way to a DIY instruction on constructing a simple H Aerial. Could you please point me in the right online direction?
@radionortheast: Does this mean that the solution in the attached paper in the original post does NOT give a more directional broadcast than a normal Dipole? And a second question: Does the coil work as a balun? (not that I understand how baluns work, they seems like witchcraft to me)

User avatar
yellowbeard
no manz can test innit
no manz can test innit
Posts: 135
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2015 5:40 am

Re: Simple directional antenna

Post by yellowbeard » Sun Jun 16, 2019 9:30 pm

Did you want help or just bants? Assistance here is inversely proportionate to attitude. You are ripping on guys that know a lot more than you or me, they may not reply to your posts in future. Make one of these:
https://web.archive.org/web/20130910092 ... /hb9cv.php
Mounted vertically you should get a radiation pattern like this:
Image
Your alternative is to buy a receiving yagi and put a 4:1 coax balun on it.

Post Reply